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Garden Folly

Friday, 6th July 2007 No Comments »

A “folly” is a fanciful structure put up more for aesthetics than function. The Old Plank store has an outdoor garden section that contains lots of urns, statues, statuettes, pots, vases, and the like. AND we have built an amazing folly that has to be seen to be believed. So if you can’t visit or want to save a little gas, we’ve made a small video that gives you a flavor of what is possible.

We can order all the architectural elements of the folly and design it to your specifications. The material is reclaimed from old buildings in England and the elements are made from original English molds. The designs can be constructed by a local masonry artist from the drawings provided by us. Anything is possible: sheds, walls, bridges, whatever. One of these follies will make you the envy of the local garden club.

Call or email us for more information at Old Plank Road.

 


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Burled Wood and Book-Matched Grain

Thursday, 12th April 2007 No Comments »

Burled wood forms naturally in nature when a tree forms bumps (or burls) on the outside of the trunk. When the wood is cut into planks, the burls create an interesting pattern in the grain and this is known as “burled wood”. Most of the burled wood we have is elm, walnut and mahogany but it can occur in other wood species too.

Book-matched grain veneer is created by splitting the tree trunk down the middle, opening it like a book and shaving off the two matching sides of the wood. This is obviously a very expensive process but produces a beautiful effect and adds richness and interest to the pattern of the grain.

                      

              Antique French Louis Philippe Chest of Drawers

                                                      Book-Matched Burled Walnut Chest of Drawers

                                                                France, circa 1860

 

 


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An American in France

Sunday, 8th April 2007 No Comments »

Corey Amaro moved to France 20 years ago with her new French husband. Her web site has some very nice photos of old French furniture, linens and bric-a-brac that she has collected over the years. If you weren’t already yearning for the Country French look, this web site will surely make you do so. We take no responsibility for the relentless urge you will get, after seeing this web site, to throw out everything you possess and scour the web for anything and everything French, old, and irresistible. Enter at your peril: http://willows95988.typepad.com/


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Timeline of French Furniture Styles

Friday, 23rd March 2007 No Comments »

1515 – 1560  Renaissance

1560 – 1643  Louis XIII

1643 – 1715  Louis XIV

1715 – 1723  Regence

1723 – 1774  Louis XV

1774 – 1792 Louis XVI

1793 – 1804 Directoire

1804 – 1814 Empire

1814 – 1830 Restoration & Charles

1830 – 1848 Louis Philippe

1848 – 1870 Second Empire (Napoleon III)

1870 – 1890 Revival

1890 – 1920 Art Nouveau

1920 – 1940 Art Deco

 


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Cherubs or Putti?

Tuesday, 6th March 2007 No Comments »

Cherubs or Putti? – Take your pick

Here at the antique store, we sometimes come across the decorative motif of putti. They are child-like figures with wings and are similar to cherubs but not exactly the same, which leads to the question: what exactly is the difference?

Putti (or are they cherubs?) can be found on child sarcophagi dating from the 2nd century. In the early15th century, they began to appear in works of art, both secular and religious, in Italy and were used by numerous artists including Donatello and Raphael. Their popularity spread to the Netherlands, Germany and Renaissance France.

It is difficult to define the difference between putti and cherubs; a convenient generalization would be to say that cherubs appear in a religious context whereas the genesis of putti is mythic or secular. Another way of looking at it is that the derivation of the word “putto” (the plural is “putti”) is from the same Italian word meaning “child” whereas cherubs are thought of as angelic and not of this world.

So next time you see a cherub/putto, take your pick, the choice is yours.



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